Professor Duncan McVicar

Professorial Research Fellow

Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research
Duncan McVicar

Contact details

Phone: +61 3 9035 4509
Fax: +61 3 8344 2111
Email: dmcvicar@unimelb.edu.au


Curriculum Vitae (pdf)

Location

Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research
Level 5, Faculty of Business and Economics Building, 111 Barry Street, The University of Melbourne


Biography

Duncan McVicar joined the Labour Economics and Social Policy group at the Melbourne Institute in July 2010, having worked since 2003 at Queens University Belfast, and prior to that at the Northern Ireland Economic Research Centre.

SSRN Author Profile

Dr Duncan McVicar's SSRN Author Page

Dr Duncan McVicar's Google Scholar Citation Page

Research Interests / Current Projects

Mostly in labour economics, including:

- Inactivity and unemployment, disability;

- Evaluation of labour market programs, welfare reforms;

- Disadvantaged young people, youth transitions, education, peer effects;

Duncan is happy to supervise PhD students in any of the above areas.

Selected Publications / Papers

McVicar, D. (2011). 'Estimates of peer effects in adolescent smoking across 26 European countries.' Social Science and Medicine, 73, 1186-93.

McVicar, D. (2011). 'Local level Incapacity Benefits rolls in Britain: Correlates and convergence.' Regional Studies (forthcoming).

Polanski, A. and McVicar, D. (2011). 'Recovering social networks from individual attributes.' Journal of Mathematical Sociology, 35, 4, 1-25

Bell, D. and McVicar, D. (2010). 'Disability, welfare systems and the labour force participation of older workers in Europe.' Twenty First Century Society (now renamed Contemporary Social Sciences), 5, 3, 261-77.

Anyadike-Danes, M and McVicar, D. (2010). 'My brilliant career: characterizing the labour market trajectories of British women of Generation X.' Sociological Methods and Research, 58, 3, 482-512.

McVicar, D. (2010). 'Does job search monitoring intensity affect unemployment? Evidence from Northern Ireland.' Economica, 77, 306, 296-313.